Panasonic CM1 - iPad - Nokia Lumia 1020 video - crazy or what?

Panasonic CM1 - iPad - Nokia Lumia 1020 video - crazy or what?
'It works well because small sensor video has been around for years anyway. After all a 1080 video frame is only 2.1MP, which makes it not that difficult to turn out decent footage. And that footage compares very well with other better specified cameras I have.'
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Is there any point to a digital zoom?

Is there any point to a digital zoom?
'The answer to the question in the title of this article would normally have been answered by me with a resounding NO! But the above samples from my Nokia 1020 smartphone have somewhat changed my opinion, at least for this particular camera. '
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Nikon Df / Voigtlander 58mm f/1.4 and Nokia Lumia 1020 - An unlikely combination

Nikon Df / Voigtlander 58mm f/1.4 and Nokia Lumia 1020 - An unlikely combination
'One of the more unlikely combinations I've ever used to take photographs is the Nikon Df + Voigtlander 58mm f/1.4 pictured above and my Nokia Lumia 1020 smartphone. 'Full Frame' sensor plus manual focus lens designed for film and a micro sensor camera phone. Unlikely maybe, but it's actually a very creative pairing allowing me to create very different images from the same source material. '
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Panasonic Lumix Smart Camera CM1 Review - Part 2 - The CM1 compared to Nokia Lumia 1020 - Is this 'Camera Future?'

 Panasonic Lumix Smart Camera CM1 Review - Part 2 - The CM1 compared to Nokia Lumia 1020 - Is this 'Camera Future?'
'So, these devices are what they are. Really useful if you want to travel light and shoot inconspicuously, but full mirrorless camera functionality, speed and quality? Not yet (But getting closer all the time.) And no I'm not about to sell everything off and just use my phones just yet, attractive proposition in terms of the long term prospects for my back that might be. But both devices (lets call them cameras because they deserve it) But both cameras are incredibly useful in many situations when they are exactly the right tool for the job.'
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HDR B/W PANORAMAS - Olympus OM-D E-M10 Nokia Lumia 1020 Smartphone

HDR B/W PANORAMAS - Olympus OM-D E-M10 Nokia Lumia 1020 Smartphone
'These are experimental chiaroscuro HDR black and white multi-image stitched 'panoramas' shot with my Olympus OM-D E-M10 and Panasonic 15mm f/1.7 lens and Nokia Lumia 1020 Smartphone. The original images (usually three or four for each pano) were uploaded onto my iPad. I then stitched them together in Autostitch and edited them with Snapseed.'
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Sensor wars - Is bigger really 'better'? Nokia Lumia 1020

Sensor wars  - Is bigger really 'better'? Nokia Lumia 1020
"I was wondering about just what quality I could squeeze from my smaller sensor cameras. Nokia Lumia 1020 smartphone. As can be seen from the picture above this was done with a tripod and selecting the lowest ISO. The Nokia also has the advantage that I can shoot raw .dng files with it. The following is what I got."
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THE STOCK PHOTOGRAPHER - NEVER OFF DUTY

THE STOCK PHOTOGRAPHER - NEVER OFF DUTY
"It's also important to realise that what appears to be mundane and commonplace to us is far from that to someone from another country and another culture. It is sometimes difficult for us to see the familiar with new eyes, but in essence that is what stock photography is all about."
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RECENT STOCK IMAGES

RECENT STOCK IMAGES
"At various times in my life I've wanted to be a train driver, a rock star and a novelist but I can't really think of anything better than waking up in the morning, looking out the window and thinking "This is a good day to go out and take some pictures.'"
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The Smartphone Aesthetic continued....

The Smartphone Aesthetic continued....

If anyone has assumed that because of my adventures with the Nikon Df, Leica T et al, I'm not shooting my 'Art of point and shoot' 'Smartphone Aesthetic' images and processing them with stacks of filters, then that is far from the case. Since I carry my Nokia 1020 and Blackberry Q10 phones with me whenever I'm out shooting.

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Odd combination - Leica T and Nokia 1020


It may well seem an odd combination and I suppose it is, but the combination of my Leica T and Nokia Lumia 1020 is really nice to use. This is the location that Heather and Mathieu of Mirrorlessons recommended and as you can see it is a lovely place. The Nokia captured the wide angle panoramic grandeur of the place and the Leica T everything else. 












So all in all yesterday was an excellent day.

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Mawddach Estuary with Nokia 1020 and Samsung galaxy 2








These are pictures taken on the extraordinary beautiful cycle trail alongside the Mawddach estuary in North Wales. And to me this shows exactly why Nokia and Samsung's approach to the development of camera / smart / phone technology is more useful than Sony's QX1 idea. 

Since I was on my bike, I wanted to travel light. But I also wanted to get decent pictures. In the past I've come up with all sorts of carrying contraptions for cameras when I'm cycling, but the Nokia 1020 and Samsung Galaxy 2 are far better solutions. I get ease of use, decent image quality and there is no problem carrying them safely. I get the really impressive image quality of the Nokia 1020 with it's panoramic wide-angle capability and the incredible zoom range from the Samsung. As you can see I took full advantage of all that.

Ultimately, I think Samsung have the right idea. Enable a camera with 'smart' technology which allows access to the internet, the cloud and is loaded with apps. for processing pictures on the move. If I so desired I could have transferred images very quickly to the Nokia and sent them wherever I wanted. Though yesterday I didn't and in fact posted a few pictures to my Instagram / facebook / Twitter accounts using just the Nokia. 






As I indicated in my post yesterday, for me the whole point about using smartphone cameras is the speed, ease of use and the ability to carry something light and simple to use that I can quickly get out to take pictures as and when. I can't see how an add-on camera module for a phone gives me that. If I want an aps-c sensor and interchangeable e-mount lenses I'll carry my Sony a6000, which gives me a much better 'photographic experience' as far as I'm concerned. Plus if I was desperate to post images to social media, isn't a smartphone by far the best option?

Technology however does take itself up blind alleys now and then and while the QX1 is probably a remarkable piece of technology, the question is does it benefit us as photographers? For me the answer is a resounding no. Yesterday the last thing I wanted to do was fiddle about with add on paraphernalia and lenses. Stopping to take a picture, slightly out of breath after cycling, the last thing I wanted to do was to mess around with a complicated piece of kit that is somewhat 'heath robinson' in it's look and implementation.

The Samsung with it's retractable lens and small compact size is an incredibly useful camera (if that's what it is) and lets me compose pictures using an incredible array of focal lengths. Small sensor admittedly, but in situations like yesterday it was absolutely perfect. 

I must admit the product I'm looking forward to most that is (supposedly) coming at Photokina is the Samsung NX1. Because of the possibilities that it offers. Adding all the smartphone technology into a camera (minus the phone of course) strikes me as absolutely the way to go. It's innovative and above all it's really useful. And it helps what I do, which is the important part.

Finally I have to return to my location and say that if you like cycling and you find yourself in North Wales, the Mawddach estuary cycle track is truly spectacular. A really special place to ride a bike. I will say however that in places like this I spend as much time off my bike as on it. But then that's no bad thing. I'm far from one of those lycra clad speed merchants with one eye on the tarmac and the other on their heart rate monitor and for me the pleasure of cycling these days is to give me access to places I can't reach by car. And rolling along on two wheels being more pleasurable to me than walking, I had a great afternoon. If you are in the area, treat yourself. 



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Small sensor magic with Panasonic FZ1000, Nokia 1020 and Samsung Galaxy 2 cameras

























Images above shot with - Panasonic FZ1000, Nokia 1020 and Samsung Galaxy 2 cameras

There is a nice article by Mathieu at Mirrorlessons about Mirrorless for Pro's. Much I would agree with and nice to see a perspective from someone, who like me, pursues a professional career without the need of a DSLR. 

As regular readers are aware however I've gone somewhat further and am now using mobile phone size and 1'' sensor cameras. Though yesterday I did use the Leica T, for the bulk of my North Wales trip I have been using these small(er) sensor cameras and particularly using the long telephoto options these cameras provide and am reaping the benefits. 

Now I'm not going to tell you that these cameras produce better results than m4/3 and APS-C sensors, they don't, though the Nokia 1020's 41MP are pretty close, but I obviously wouldn't be compromising my earning potential by using gear that produces files that would be rejected by stock image libraries or indeed not suitable for buyers and their reproduction needs. And of course they are perfectly acceptable for print reproduction up to A3. 

As you can see I'm getting some great pictures, without breaking my back. Small sensors rule OK!!





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Picture making choices - Fuji X100s, Nokia 1020, Blackberry Q10 - HDR documentary photography








The above images were taken yesterday using three cameras. Fuji X100S + teleconverter, Nokia 1020 and Blackberry Q10 smartphones. Now I wasn't planning to use the last one, but the battery on my Fuji ran out of power, as it does quicker than it should and I wanted to keep on shooting square images and see that square when I took the picture, which the Nokia doesn't allow me to do. 

Since I now carry both phones with me all the time I'm out, the Blackberry for phone calls and emails and the Nokia for the web, I've usually got three picture making devices with me. The size of the phones makes that possible. (Though I wonder whether I can describe the Nokia as a phone. I have now actually made one call on it, but I'm essentially using it as a 'mini tablet when I'm out with it.) It also allows me the opportunity to work with the cameras and lenses I have left.

The Sony A7 has gone (again!) as have the Panasonic GX7 and GM1, plus a few lenses. There's more to go when I get round to it, but as per usual, I don't like to sell stuff, even though I may not use it much. Because different camera / lens combinations offer different things and for me at the picture taking end that means something. Where I've ceased to see any meaningful use in discussing the gear I use is when the images become a reality. (If a digital images consisting of 0's and 1's can be considered 'real'.) Consequently I haven't said which camera took with pictures.

Many of you will be able to work out what I took the above images with anyway, but ultimately it's unimportant. I've never subscribed to the 'best camera you have is the one you have with you' philosophy, because I see it used too often as an excuse for poor images and I make sure that the 'best camera(s) I have is (are) the one(s) I choose to take with me. And at the moment I'm very happy with my options. 

Finally I thought you might like to see how I've processed the above images for some (not all) picture libraries. i.e. the ones who are keen to put together 'smartphone stock.'








This is a look that I've been working towards for a while and it's one I like very much. It's also proving popular with the aforementioned libraries who are trying to promote that 'smartphone aesthetic.' It has to be said the people who buy pictures seem to be able to take it or leave it currently (mostly leave it!) But since I've got tens of thousands of images sitting on library sites with a more 'conventional' look, I like shooting editorial or non released documentary images and at present the market for that is in it's early stages via microstock, I'm prepared to give it a go for a while. 

I've got an article in preparation about this and the processing choices I'm making and that should be ready in a few days. But the shorthand version is I wanted to shoot some documentary or 'street photography' (god I hate that term with a passion and can hardly bring myself to write it) images and I wanted them to look different. And I'm not that bothered about their commercial potential (or otherwise) at the moment. So that's why I'm doing it. 

Anyway, after a period of time when I was working non-stop because of the weather, I'll have some time to post on the blog a bit more now, since the weather has reverted to type and today (a national holiday of course) it's raining and actually quite cold. So in between hours of editing I should be able to fit in some more regular posting, instead of the 'bus' type nature of what's been going on lately. The 'You wait ages for one then lot's come at once' scenario. 

http://www.bigstockphoto.com/search/?contributor=david+martyn&safesearch=n&order=new


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It's a rotten job but somebody's got to do it - 'Working' with the Nokia 1020 and Samsung Galaxy 2 camera










Nokia 1020 and Samsung Galaxy 2 cameras

I suppose if you consider that driving down to Worcester, getting my bike out and cycling around the recently fully open circuit of the River Severn and Diglis canal basin and taking some pictures as 'working' then that's what I was doing on Sunday afternoon. 

I do like from time to time to try and show just what a wonderful job I have. Because I'm not sure that cycling around an interesting and scenic place taking some pictures with a couple of new cameras can be bettered as far as I'm concerned and to consider something as much fun as that as 'work' is plainly ridiculous. Now I'm not going to say that I'm lucky to be able to do this, because luck has very little to do with it. It's down to hard work and patience mostly. But it is indeed how I make a living. So not luck, but certainly a privilege. 

And it does strike me as somewhat strange that a lot of professional photographers whinge about what they do. The wedding photographers who moan about the 'weekend warriors' undercutting them and taking their work, the commercial and advertising photographers who moan about the fact that they can't think of a number and double it when they charge a client anymore and the high street photographers who complain about the fact that nobody brings their children to be photographed anymore in front of a 'set' consisting of fluffy kittens and milk churns. 


They moaned (and moan) about 35mm, digital, mirrorless and now smartphones. They moaned (and moan) about people going off to get a print copied instead of getting a new 6x4" from them for £35 and they moaned (and moan) about how amateurs without their skill and experience can sell photographs taken on auto everything cameras and can't develop a film and make a print in a darkroom created from twigs and string halfway up a mountain in a blizzard.

But mostly they moan about "Why can't things be the same as they always were?' Now I said that hard work and patience has led me to where I am today, but there is one other factor that has contributed to my situation. And that is an open mind. The ability to consider new possibilities, new directions, new ways of working, new tools to work with and new ways to present photographs. If ever the phrase 'adapt or die' applies to any profession, then it applies to photography as much, if not more, than any other way of earning a crust. 

To begin with we are all, as professional photographers, doing as a job what most of the world does as a pastime or hobby. So if we manage to achieve a viable financial state doing what most people would consider as a 'luxury' trade, then we should be thankful for that to start with. I know I am. We should also consider the fact that, as in most jobs, nobody owes us a living and it's important to remember that we have to earn our wages. And I see as part of that to be keenly aware of what has happened, what is happening and what might happen in the future. Because, I'm enjoying what I'm doing far too much to let it slip through complacency and a sense of entitlement. 

And the notion that people will fall at my feet and throw money at me just because I pull a big camera and even bigger lens out of my camera bag, is a recipe for a significant comeuppance followed by an even more significant downslide. So over the years I've declined to cultivate the 'old pro' ethic and chosen instead to go with my instincts and keep that enthusiastic approach that started on me on this whole journey. For me there is no other alternative. Because I want to keep doing what I was doing on Sunday afternoon. And I'll do whatever it takes to make that possible.


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Sansung Galaxy 2 Camera Nokia Lumia 1020 and Combined Harvester



















Images - Samsung Galaxy Camera 2 and Nokia Lumia 1020 - Various apps. / filters - Photoshop, Snapseed, Fotor, Instagram

Ann and I were driving home after a cycling / photo trip (of which more in the next post) when we saw a combined harvester in a field through a dense line of trees and hedges. Thinking we wouldn't get a view we were pleasantly surprised to see a gate with a clear view. Having got ahead of the harvester we set up with the Samsung and Nokia cameras and shot the pictures above as it passed. 

http://www.istockphoto.com/search/portfolio/1491163/?facets={%2225%22%3A%226%22}#1130ef3

We will be uploading filtered and unfiltered versions to various libraries, these are the filtered versions. Images like this are classic stock photographs and it will be interesting to see if these filtered versions get any sales. Much as we like them, there are an awful lot of pictures like this available fo sale on stock libraries, so at least these will look 'different'. 

The day was interesting in that we came to a decision, to pretty much cut back on the interchangeable lens systems and work with zoom lens cameras like the Samsung and the Sony RX10. The Panasonic FZ1000 is now available in the UK and one of those will be ordered today. The reason for this is the top shot, which is the best. The head on horizontal framing with the dramatic clouds was taken on the Samsung at 262mm (35mm film approximation) This is why we like zoom lenses. We were only able to work from one position and with a zoom there was the opportunity to put together a series of different views. Add in the fact that we only had a few minutes to do this and the advantages of a 'superzoom' are obvious. 

Finally a word of praise for the people who drive these things. Currently they are working flat out all over the country, starting at dawn and often working when it's dark with lights attached. They are doing nothing less than help feed us all. Puts making a living as a photographer into perspective.




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Pushing the Nokia Lumia 1020 - Just how good is the dynamic range?

F





Contrasty evening light is a good test for any camera, let alone a micro sensor smartphone. However, a combination of careful exposure and Snapseed's rather good HDR feature achieves a workable result. There is some highlight loss certainly and this has to be restored for print purposes by altering the levels to something similar to the screen shot below.

By eliminating pure white and black, print reproduction isn't compromised.

http://en.fotolia.com/p/148423?order=undiscovered
View my stock images on Fotolia

But the impact of an image isn't determined by technical considerations and certainly some of the editing packages for phone pictures, such as snapseed, don't really take dynamic range into consideration. Though interestingly Instagram has highlight and shadow controls for all it's filter effects.


Certainly dynamic range is not one of my primary concerns and I've never obsessed about blown highlights. For me it has little bearing on the effectiveness of an image. In a way it does contribute to a sense of reality. Bright sunlit highlights are very difficult to look at and assimilate in real life anyway. Obviously retaining as much detail is preferable, but for me, not essential.

http://www.dreamstime.com/davidmartyn_info 
View my stock images on Dreamstime

I should conclude by saying how much I like Snapseed. It gives a punchy dramatic look to my images. It's quick and easy to use and saves me lots of work in Photoshop.

Finally, I'm starting to include these Stock Photography inserts into the posts, to show what I'm shooting, what I'm working on and what I'm uploading. I'll rotate the libraries to give an idea of what I upload to each. 

Also if you are interested in this, it's worth keeping an eye on my Instagram account, as even if I don't post here I add to that every day. This shows where I am and what I'm doing. If I'm not out shooting I'll post examples of what I'm working on. 

Yesterdays posts for instance previewed what's coming next here. See top left and bottom right corners.

http://instagram.com/soundimageplus

 

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Comments, gear and the creative process


All pictures above shot yesterday afternoon in 
Stratford upon Avon with a Nokia 1020 and 
Sony A7r + 35mm f/2.8 Zeiss lens.
Processed using Snapseed, Photoshop and Instagram. 


 The above two shots were taken, as an experiment, with my Voigtlander 20mm fitted to my Panasonic GX7. The lens was set to f/11 with the hyperfocal distance at f/8. Images were shot at high ISO's on the GX7 and processed in Snapseed and Photoshop. It's a nice 'dreamy' retro, low saturation look that I like and somewhat different to my usual high saturation and high contrast preference. A nice alternative to have.

Somebody wrote this in a comment in one of my Google+groups.

'....your camera tastes/style/phases change quicker than a tween posting selfies on an iPhone....'

Even if it was true, which it's not, so what? Do musicians have to put up with this? 'You used lots of different guitars on your last album and you have songs in different styles - tut tut'

It's about as relevant as mentioning how many paintbrushes a painter has or pointing out that a sculptor keeps changing chisels!!

I do get pretty annoyed with this, because it's yet another example of how people regard the gear as more important than the photography. It also shows something else. The fundamental lack of understanding that photography is a creative process and that people involved in any creative process have to be constantly open to new ideas, new ways of working, new possibilities. That's the nature of creativity. Picasso worked in a variety of different styles and mediums. David Bowie is known for completely changing his approach, style, musicians and content from album to album. 

I have got comments like this a lot over the years and first off it's pretty rude. I don't make disapproving personal comments about how they choose to work and take pictures to the people who read this and I expect the same in return. I also make no comment about the gear people use or the frequency with which they change it. (or not) 

It also shows a complete misunderstanding of what it's like to be a professional photographer. No matter what field we work in, every time we go out to shoot we have to get results. And just recycling the same old stuff with the same old camera / lens combinations and with the same old look isn't going to help our future earning prospects. Too often artists in any field have had success with one way of working and haven't been able to move beyond that. At the height of their popularity, they are much in demand, but tastes change, styles change and it's the savvy artist who moves on before their admirers do.

Am I over reacting? Well maybe, but my blog, my rules. And if anyone else feels the need to make comments like this, then think again. Because you'll suffer the same fate as the poster of the above trite comment, which is to have your hook slung. Because as I keep ON and ON and ON about, this is a blog about making pictures. The top banner says

SOUNDIMAGEPLUS
Photography and it's means of production.
  
And that's what cameras, lenses and all the paraphenalia that comes with being a photographer these days is. A means of production. Not the be all and end all, as some seem to believe. And a gear obsessed photographer is a static photographer. And a static photographer who thinks they have all the answers is a bad photographer.

One of the things that permeates the photographic internet is a kind of dead hand certainty. A conviction on the part of some pundits and commentators that they are sorted. They have found the answer to all their photographic questions. They then of course gratuitously share it with the rest of us, much to our undying gratitude!!

For me, certainty and the answers to the questions is creative death. Because contentment breeds complacency. Cows are contented, but I haven't seen any of them produce any great art lately. For me, the constant state of flux I'm in is what it's all about. The kind of pictures I take and the ways I take them, edit them and present them is constantly changing. And that's the way I like it. I never thought a certain amount of bi-polarity was harmful anyway. Because what do we do when we're satisfied? What do we do when we have those answers to the questions that we hopefully pose ourselves? I would venture to suggest that we'll do nothing much at all.

So where I'm currently headed may be a dead end, a wrong turn and yet again it could be a resounding commercial and aesthetic success. So, it could be my Tin Machine or my Let's Dance, who knows. What I do know is that I have no intention of 'reigning myself in' either intellectually, artistically or in terms of what I buy, what I sell and what I make pictures with. I trust my instincts and they haven't let me down so far, so I'm inclined to carry on in much the same way. I'm incredibly energised by what I'm doing at the moment and I'll work out whether what I'm producing is any good at a later date. Because I'm having far too good a time to bother with that now. 

Finally to show where this all ends up. Here's a couple of links to some of my current picture library portfolios.

http://en.fotolia.com/p/148423?order=relevance&offset=0

http://clashot.com/davidmartyn.html

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