FUJI X-PRO 1 and ADOBE CAMERA RAW

Fuji X-Pro 1 60mm lens

While now having Adobe Camera Raw support for the X-PRO 1, there is a distinct improvement over the Silkypix Fuji software. However, I'm discovering that this is not just the case of using my usual settings and everything's great. Because of the nature of the colour array in the Fuji sensor, I'm finding that I'm having to exercise some care. I haven't yet found what I think is the best way to process for me, but here's what I'm experiencing so far.

Fuji X-Pro 1 35mm lens

Fuji X-Pro 1 35mm lens

Fuji X-Pro 1 35mm lens

Fuji X-Pro 1 60mm lens

First off its nice to be able to use the same work flow for all my cameras, without having to use two software programmes to work on my images. This will also give me the chance to compare properly the differences between the Fuji and other cameras results.

So, some early observations.

Its very easy to improve the dynamic range.

Fuji X-Pro 1 Adobe Camera Raw

This gives an example of just what detail ACR can pull out of an X-Pro 1 file.

Fuji X-Pro 1 Adobe Camera Raw

This shows the level of detail possible with raw files at ISO 6400. Note the relative lack of noise combined with the total lack of "smoothing" "smudging" etc. I think this is quite remarkable.

Fuji X-Pro 1 Adobe Camera Raw

Here is a full-size comparison with an out of camera jpg. and a raw file processed in ACR. I will get this better given time to experiment, and this shows a very minor difference at first glance, but there are improvements over the jpg.

Fuji X-Pro 1 Adobe Camera Raw
Click on image > flickr > Actions > View all sizes > Original for the high-res version

One thing that doesn't work is oversharpening. I got a "painterly watercolour effect" particularly in the greens. If you look at the example below and look at the grass on the canal bank to the left of the boat on the blown-up version and you'll see what I mean.

Fuji X-Pro 1 Adobe Camera Raw


So, good news in terms of a more versatile way of processing the raw files. The Silkypix software certainly has problems. I often got blown highlights and an overall softness when using it and try as I might I couldn't really get anything that improved on the jpgs. That software more or less looks like a version of what goes on inside the camera transferred into a stand-alone package, with no real options to seriously work on an image.

ACR is obviously a much more responsive and flexible programme, but it does seem that the unique nature of the sensor means that some of my normal techniques may not work so well. Interestingly, I have a preset saved that defaults to the parameters in the previous version of the Camera Raw plug-in, and I felt that I got slightly better results.

I will obviously be spending more time with this and it usually does take a while before I'm happy with what I get. I have a suspicion that this may take a while longer than normal. However, despite all this, it does once again confirm my belief that the output from the X-Pro1 produces extraordinary image quality, which as far as I'm concerned is the best I've seen.

If anyone else is experimenting with this, it would be good to hear your experiences, since we all process in different ways. 

More posts on these issues:-
http://soundimageplus.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/fuji-x-pro-1-raw-file-workaround.html 

http://soundimageplus.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/theres-no-such-thing-as-free-lunch-fuji.html







N.B. to see more on the cameras and lenses featured in this post click on the relevant labels (tags and keywords) below.
All original material on this blog is © Soundimageplus
For comment and discussion - join me over at Google+
about soundimageplus - soundimageplus website
soundimageplus on flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/45203414@N06/
soundimageplus blog readers pictures group - http://www.flickr.com/groups/1705334@N24/
soundimageplus on YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/user/soundimageplus
soundimageplus on Vimeo - http://vimeo.com/user1050904/video